Hip

Hip Conditions :: Hip Procedures

Hip Conditions

Normal Anatomy of the Hip Joint

The thigh bone, femur, and the pelvis, acetabulum, join to form the hip joint. The hip joint is a “ball and socket” joint. The “ball” is the head of the femur, or thigh bone, and the “socket” is the cup shaped acetabulum.

Find out more about Normal Anatomy of the Hip Joint with the following links.

Osteoarthritis of Hip

Osteoarthritis, also called degenerative joint disease is the most common form of arthritis. It occurs most often in older people. This disease affects the tissue covering the ends of bones in a joint (cartilage). In a person with osteoarthritis, the cartilage becomes damaged and worn out causing pain, swelling, stiffness and restricted movement in the affected joint.

Femoro Acetabular Impingement (FAI)

Femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) is a condition where there is too much friction in the hip joint from bony irregularities causing pain and decreased range of hip motion. The femoral head and acetabulum rub against each other creating damage and pain to the hip joint. The damage can occur to the articular cartilage (the smooth white surface of the ball or socket) or the labral tissue (the lining of the edge of the socket) during normal movement of the hip. The articular cartilage or labral tissue can fray or tear after repeated friction.

Find out more about Femoro Acetabular Impingement (FAI) with the following links.

Hip Fracture

The hip joint is a “ball and socket” joint. The “ball” is the head of the femur, or thigh bone, and the “socket” is the cup shaped acetabulum. The joint surface is covered by a smooth articular surface that allows pain free movement in the joint.

Find out more about Hip Fracture with the following link.

Inflammatory Arthritis of the Hip

Inflammation of the joints is referred to as arthritis. The inflammation arises when the smooth covering (cartilage) at the end surfaces of the bones wears away. In some cases, the inflammation is caused when the lining of the joint becomes inflamed as part of an underlying systemic disease. These conditions are referred to as inflammatory arthritis.

Find out more about Inflammatory Arthritis of the Hip with the following link.

Hip Procedures

Total Hip Replacement (THR)

Total hip replacement is a surgical procedure in which the damaged cartilage and bone is removed from the hip joint and replaced with artificial components. The hip joint is one of the body's largest weight-bearing joints, located between the thigh bone (femur) and the pelvis (acetabulum).

Find out more about Total Hip Replacement (THR) with the following links.

Revision Hip Replacement

Revision hip replacement surgery is performed under general anaesthesia. During the procedure, your surgeon will make an incision over the hip to expose the hip joint. Then the femur is dislocated from the acetabulum so that the old plastic liner and the metal socket can be removed from the acetabulum.

Find out more about Revision Hip Replacement with the following links.

Hip Arthroscopy

Arthroscopy, also referred to as keyhole or minimally invasive surgery, is a procedure in which an arthroscope is inserted into a joint to check for any damage and repair it simultaneously.

Find out more about Hip Arthroscopy with the following links.

Click on the topics below to find out more from the orthopaedic connection website of American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons.

  • Royal Australasian College of Surgeons
  • Australian Orthopaedic Association
  • Insight Clinic
  • Albury Wodonga Private Hospital